One of the most common third-party claims in no-fault states is the “mini-tort” claim. In no-fault states such as Michigan, “mini-tort” laws allow you to claim a small, statutorily-mandated amount of money from “the other driver’s” insurance company. Most no-fault insurers will require you to collect the mini-tort amount to offset whatever they are obligated to pay. Another common instance of a third-party claim in a no-fault state is an employment-related claim. Injuries or damages sustained in the course of your job or in a company vehicle often result in third-party claims.
To determine how much auto insurance is best for you comes down to understanding your current economic circumstances and how the different types of coverage work together. If you own a car, buying car insurance is inevitable, so it is really important you are getting the right amount for the right price. The following table gives a quick summary of what types of insurance you should have.
First time default on premium payments by a policy holder is termed as First Unpaid Premium. Description: With each premium payment a receipt is issued which indicates the next due date of premium payment. If the premium is not paid, this date becomes the date of first unpaid premium. Also See: New Business Premium, Return, Annuity, Insurable Interest, Insurability
Comprehensive insurance is commonly confused with collision. They both insure your car but cover different events. Collision covers car accidents, and comprehensive covers events out of your control. Think of it like this: Collision is colliding with something else (other than animals). Comprehensive is basically all other events. Accidents with animals are covered by comprehensive (and not collision) because these accidents are considered out of your control.
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