Third-party claims occur with less frequency in no-fault car insurance states, where you first look to your own insurance company to recover, regardless of who is actually at fault for an accident or injury. Generally, no-fault states have mandatory minimum insurance requirements, meaning that every driver carries a statutorily dictated minimum amount of insurance. If, after you’ve made the appropriate claims to your own insurance company, your claim meets your state's monetary threshold or "serious injury" threshold for stepping outside of no-fault, you may be able to initiate a third-party claim.

Definition: Motor third-party insurance or third-party liability cover, which is sometimes also referred to as the 'act only' cover, is a statutory requirement under the Motor Vehicles Act. It is referred to as a 'third-party' cover since the beneficiary of the policy is someone other than the two parties involved in the contract (the car owner and the insurance company). The policy does not provide any benefit to the insured. However, it covers the insured's legal liability for death/disability of third-party loss or damage to the third-party property.

Susan was driving home from Thanksgiving dinner at her family cottage when suddenly she hit a deer. Thankfully she was okay, but her car was destroyed. She called the police to make an accident report, then called her insurance worried that this might not be fully covered. Her insurance representative reassured her, she has comprehensive insurance, so the damage would be covered under her policy.

If you own a car, car insurance is a required expense in 48 of the 50 states. A lack of diligence when shopping for your car insurance could lead to a hefty monthly bill, as well as headaches if you actually need to file a claim. We researched and explored quotes from over 128 companies in 2,700 cities to determine which insurers had the lowest costs, nationally and in each state. Our team also evaluated which companies had the best track record for customer service and the claims process.
First time default on premium payments by a policy holder is termed as First Unpaid Premium. Description: With each premium payment a receipt is issued which indicates the next due date of premium payment. If the premium is not paid, this date becomes the date of first unpaid premium. Also See: New Business Premium, Return, Annuity, Insurable Interest, Insurability
Actual cash value equals the purchase price of your car minus depreciation and your deductible. So comprehensive coverage will pay an amount up to the actual cash value of your car to either repair or (in the case of a total loss) replace it. If the cost of repairs exceeds your car's ACV, your car insurance company will declare it a total loss and pay the sum of the car's ACV to help you replace it — unless you opt to retain salvage (i.e., keep the totaled car), in which case the salvage value will also be deducted from your payout.
We collected quotes from a variety of insurance companies across 2,700 towns and cities in the U.S, for 128 insurance companies. Our sample driver was a 30 year old male who drove a 2011 Toyota Camry. To obtain quotes, we kept parameters for getting coverage the same, such as that he was single, and had a clean driving record. The only parameter that changed was the zip code where he lived in the U.S. The amount of coverage we opted for gave our driver bit more than what is required of state minimums.
Mark was driving on the highway and all of a sudden a rock hit the windshield and created a crack. As soon as Mark got home, he called his insurance representative and was told that he didn't need to worry, he had comprehensive coverage which may help to repair or replace a broken or shattered windshield, he may only have to pay his deductible and the rest would be covered.
Liberty Mutual actually tied Erie insurance for this category, but since we already called Erie the best overall company, we'll describe how Liberty Mutual is well known for a strong shopping experience. Customers of Liberty Mutual report in the study they were particularly satisfied with the flexibility of policies offered by Liberty Mutual, as well as their relationship with Liberty Mutual agents. If Erie is not located in your state, Liberty Mutual can be a good alternative if you can get a competitive rate.
Product liability insurance is typically mandated by legislation, the scale of which varies by country and often varies by industry. This type of insurance covers all major product classes and types, including chemicals, agricultural products, and recreational equipment; and protects companies against lawsuits over products or components that cause damage or injury.
Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which control coverage determinations. Such terms may vary by state, and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
There is a case to be made for getting just comprehensive and not collision insurance, even if your car is not valuable. Comprehensive covers you for a lot more perils than does collision--including, most importantly, against theft. Regardless of the value of your car, having it stolen is a major inconvenience. Even if your car is worth only $2,000 at the time of the theft, and your insurer gives you $1,500, that sum would go a long way in buying yourself a new vehicle. As we discuss in more detail below, comprehensive insurance generally costs no more than $200 per year, so a $1,500 reimbursement would make the coverage valuable.
Our data shows that 7% of Progressive drivers with comprehensive coverage have a comprehensive claim in a given year, and the average repair is about $1,400. Without comprehensive, that's how much you may have to pay out of pocket. Keep in mind, repair costs can vary widely based on your damage and how much your car is worth. Typically more expensive cars cost more to repair.
×