To determine how much auto insurance is best for you comes down to understanding your current economic circumstances and how the different types of coverage work together. If you own a car, buying car insurance is inevitable, so it is really important you are getting the right amount for the right price. The following table gives a quick summary of what types of insurance you should have.

Erie is the cheapest insurance company, and arguably the most reliable insurance company as well. They score points by allowing customers to start their quote online, which we personally found to be a streamlined and fast process. Erie also scored the highest marks from the number of policies they offer. Erie offers pet coverage, free accident forgiveness, free vanishing deductibles, roadside assistance, and many more, essentially giving its customers a degree of flexibility not even found amongst the largest insurers. Customers of Erie may also be eligible for its Rate Lock program. This is a unique program where customers won't see their rates increase except for three reasons: you move to a different area, add or remove someone from your policy, or add or subtract a car. Lastly, despite its smaller size, Erie offers the same types of discounts larger national insurers provide such as bundling, anti-lock brakes, anti-theft, young driver and senior driver among others.
Pretty much all drivers are subject to the risks mentioned above, so the short answer to the question is, "Almost everybody." Take animal collisions, for example. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, there are more than 1.5 million deer-vehicle collisions every year, resulting in over $1 billion in vehicle damage — and that's just deer-vehicle collisions.

Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.

Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which control coverage determinations. Such terms may vary by state, and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
Safe Auto Group Agency, Inc and/or its affiliates (“Safe Auto”) is located and operated exclusively in the United States of America. Safe Auto does not offer goods and/or services in any language of an European county, does not deal in any European currencies, and does not underwrite risks for or issue policies to individuals or companies located in the European Union.

Third-party insurance is an insurance policy purchased for protection against the claims of another. One of the most common types is third-party insurance is automobile insurance. Third-party offers coverage against claims of damages and losses incurred by a driver who is not the insured, the principal, and is therefore not covered under the insurance policy. The driver who caused damages is the third party.
Pretty much all drivers are subject to the risks mentioned above, so the short answer to the question is, "Almost everybody." Take animal collisions, for example. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, there are more than 1.5 million deer-vehicle collisions every year, resulting in over $1 billion in vehicle damage — and that's just deer-vehicle collisions.
One of the most common third-party claims in no-fault states is the “mini-tort” claim. In no-fault states such as Michigan, “mini-tort” laws allow you to claim a small, statutorily-mandated amount of money from “the other driver’s” insurance company. Most no-fault insurers will require you to collect the mini-tort amount to offset whatever they are obligated to pay. Another common instance of a third-party claim in a no-fault state is an employment-related claim. Injuries or damages sustained in the course of your job or in a company vehicle often result in third-party claims.
A business owners policy combines a variety of coverages into one policy that offers comprehensive protection to business owners. One of the major components of such a policy is third-party liability, which protects your business should it cause harm to others. This coverage not only applies to customer slips and falls in your store, but also to damage from defective products, incorrect installation and harm caused by one of your employees.
You can then select from third-party only cover, third-party fire and theft cover or comprehensive cover to filter the results. It’s also a good idea to filter and compare by monthly and annual costs, because a monthly payment cycle could see you pay more than you might with a one-off yearly payment – once you factor in the interest that gets added on to your repayments.

The legal liability of the insured person is covered under the third-party insurance policy in the case of disability or demise of the third party, and any damage or loss to the property of the third party. The third-party liability policy takes care of the financial and legal burden in such circumstances. Despite the fact that the direct beneficiary is neither the insurance company nor the insurer, but a third party, this is the most crucial benefit that a third party insurance secures for the owner or the driver of the insured vehicle.
Policies typically use vague language when referring to acts of terrorism, but they are generally insured by the comprehensive portion of your policy. For example, if there is an act of terror and you need to make a claim on your car, that can only be made if you have comprehensive coverage. Since some circumstances are out of our control, comprehensive insurance is certainly important to have in your policy.
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