The liability portion of the policy helps cover bodily injury and property damage claims for injuries or damage that happen to third parties in your apartment, or even as a result of your normal activities away from home. A slip, fall, or dog bite can result not only in medical bills that have to be taken care of, but also the possibility of a lawsuit.

Accidental death benefit and dismemberment is an additional benefit paid to the policyholder in the event of his death due to an accident. Dismemberment benefit is paid if the insured dies or loses his limbs or sight in the accident. Description: In an event of death, the insured person gets the additional amount mentioned under these benefits in the insurance policy. These are the supplementary
Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
No. Third-Party Car Insurance is obligatory for all motor vehicles. Third party risk insurance is compulsory under the statute of the Indian Motor Vehicles Act, 1988. You may be a good driver, but it does not negate the fact, that the vehicle you drive can become the victim of a disaster that was caused by another vehicle. In such a situation, you will be grateful that the driver involved has a third-party car insurance cover that you can raise a claim on.
First time default on premium payments by a policy holder is termed as First Unpaid Premium. Description: With each premium payment a receipt is issued which indicates the next due date of premium payment. If the premium is not paid, this date becomes the date of first unpaid premium. Also See: New Business Premium, Return, Annuity, Insurable Interest, Insurability
One of the most common third-party claims in no-fault states is the “mini-tort” claim. In no-fault states such as Michigan, “mini-tort” laws allow you to claim a small, statutorily-mandated amount of money from “the other driver’s” insurance company. Most no-fault insurers will require you to collect the mini-tort amount to offset whatever they are obligated to pay. Another common instance of a third-party claim in a no-fault state is an employment-related claim. Injuries or damages sustained in the course of your job or in a company vehicle often result in third-party claims.
While there are a couple of benefits of collision insurance, the main one is that you can file a claim and receive reimbursement regardless of who was at fault. Collision claims usually get processed faster than property damage claims because the insurance company does not have to spend time investigating who was at-fault. Another benefit is that you only deal with your own insurance company, rather than another insurer with less incentive to pay for your claim. Collision insurance can also be used toward your rental car in most cases, which can spare you from having to buy rental car insurance.
Third-party claims are much more prevalent in “fault” states than in “no-fault” states. While no-fault generally require an injured party to first recover from their own insurance company, fault states have no such requirement. In fault states, if you sustain an injury to your person or damage to your vehicle in a car accident you can make a claim with “the other driver’s” insurance company -- provided they were at fault for the accident.
There are some characteristics of a third-party car accident claim that are universal. First and foremost, a third-party claim does not involve a contractual obligation between the injured party and the insurance company. This sounds more complicated than it really is. Simply put, a third-party claim is the legal name for making a claim on another’s auto insurance policy. Exactly how and when such claims can be made vary based upon the presence (or lack thereof) of no-fault laws, but the overriding principle remains constant.
Florida, Kentucky, South Carolina mandate the repair by comprehensive insurance coverage without a deductible because they have found that driving with damaged windshields is dangerous, this is an advantage of comprehensive coverage in these states. This being said, most insurance companies will waive the deductible in the case of a glass repair, so it is worth calling your agent or representative to know your conditions.

There are some characteristics of a third-party car accident claim that are universal. First and foremost, a third-party claim does not involve a contractual obligation between the injured party and the insurance company. This sounds more complicated than it really is. Simply put, a third-party claim is the legal name for making a claim on another’s auto insurance policy. Exactly how and when such claims can be made vary based upon the presence (or lack thereof) of no-fault laws, but the overriding principle remains constant.

The practice of deferring the outlays incurred in the acquisition of new business over the term of the insurance contract is called deferred acquisition cost. Description: Acquisition costs are the direct and indirect variable outlays incurred by an insurer at the time of selling or underwriting an insurance contract (both new and renewal). The costs may be in the form of brokerage, underwrit


Third-party car insurance protects you from any liability claimed by a third party due to injury or property damage in an accident. Without this cover, you are not allowed to ply your vehicle on roads. Comprehensive car insurance is quite extensive. It safeguards your vehicle from natural and man-made calamities. Any damage to your car due to vandalism, earthquake, flood, storm, strike, riot, terrorist attack, or theft etc. will be taken care of by this plan. However, if we compare both these plans on the grounds of benefits offered, the comprehensive plan appears more appealing. Here's why:

Pretty much all drivers are subject to the risks mentioned above, so the short answer to the question is, "Almost everybody." Take animal collisions, for example. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, there are more than 1.5 million deer-vehicle collisions every year, resulting in over $1 billion in vehicle damage — and that's just deer-vehicle collisions.

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Insurance contracts that do not come under the ambit of life insurance are called general insurance. The different forms of general insurance are fire, marine, motor, accident and other miscellaneous non-life insurance. Description: The tangible assets are susceptible to damages and a need to protect the economic value of the assets is needed. For this purpose, general insurance products are b
NerdWallet compared quotes from these insurers in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include liability, collision, comprehensive, and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages, as well as any other coverage required in each state. Our “good driver” profile is a 40-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier.

The price of car insurance can vary greatly between states. One company may be expensive in Utah, but inexpensive in New York. In some states, a small, local company could even offer the best price. Below, click through to your state to see which company and cities have the least expensive car insurance based on the numerous studies we've conducted.


Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
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