Third Party Car Insurance is a risk cover, under which the insurer compensates any legal liabilities claimed by the other party, in case the insured vehicle is at fault. However, as per the Motor Vehicles Act 1988, Section 146, plying an uninsured vehicle on Indian roads is an offence. This is why liability insurance is also known as ‘Act Only’ plan. This plan doesn’t cover the insured or his car.
The legal liability of the insured person is covered under the third-party insurance policy in the case of disability or demise of the third party, and any damage or loss to the property of the third party. The third-party liability policy takes care of the financial and legal burden in such circumstances. Despite the fact that the direct beneficiary is neither the insurance company nor the insurer, but a third party, this is the most crucial benefit that a third party insurance secures for the owner or the driver of the insured vehicle.
No states require comprehensive coverage, but those who finance or lease their car will probably find that their lender or lessee requires it. Lenders and lessees are the official owners of the vehicle, so they want to make sure they're adequately protected in case of an incident. For the same reasons, you'll rarely be able to buy comprehensive insurance without also purchasing bodily injury liability and collision coverages.
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Our data shows that 7% of Progressive drivers with comprehensive coverage have a comprehensive claim in a given year, and the average repair is about $1,400. Without comprehensive, that's how much you may have to pay out of pocket. Keep in mind, repair costs can vary widely based on your damage and how much your car is worth. Typically more expensive cars cost more to repair.
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