Adverse selection is a phenomenon wherein the insurer is confronted with the probability of loss due to risk not factored in at the time of sale. This occurs in the event of an asymmetrical flow of information between the insurer and the insured. Description: Adverse selection occurs when the insured deliberately hides certain pertinent information from the insurer. The information may be of crit
AAMI Life Insurance, AAMI Income Protection and Accidental Injury Insurance are issued by Asteron Life & Superannuation Limited ABN 87 073 979 530, AFSL 229880 (Asteron) other than the Redundancy Benefit which is issued by AAI Limited ABN 48 005 297 807, AFSL 230859 (AAI) trading as AAMI which is  part of the Suncorp Group. Asteron is part of the TAL Dai-ichi Life Australia Pty Limited ABN 97 150 070 483 group of companies (TAL). Asteron is authorised to use the AAMI brand. The different entities of TAL and Suncorp are not responsible for, or liable in respect of, products and services provided by the other. AAI trading as AAMI does not provide any financial product advice in relation to AAMI Life Insurance, Accidental Injury and Income Protection (except in relation to the Redundancy Benefit) (Life Products). Any advice on this page in connection with the Life Products is general in nature and is provided by Platform Ventures Pty Ltd ABN 35 626 745 177 AFS Representative Number 001266101 (PV). PV is part of the Suncorp Group and an authorised representative of TAL Direct Pty Limited ABN 39 084 666 017, AFSL 243260 (TAL Direct).
It is the rare occasion where you hit something while driving and it is not counted against you as a responsible accident. Most states and insurance companies will not consider this kind of claim a responsible accident. Contact your insurance company to find out how they view this and make sure that there would not be charges associated with a comprehensive claim.

Third-party claims occur with less frequency in no-fault car insurance states, where you first look to your own insurance company to recover, regardless of who is actually at fault for an accident or injury. Generally, no-fault states have mandatory minimum insurance requirements, meaning that every driver carries a statutorily dictated minimum amount of insurance. If, after you’ve made the appropriate claims to your own insurance company, your claim meets your state's monetary threshold or "serious injury" threshold for stepping outside of no-fault, you may be able to initiate a third-party claim.


Comprehensive insurance is a coverage that helps pay to replace or repair your vehicle if it's stolen or damaged in an incident that's not a collision. Comprehensive typically covers damage from fire, vandalism or falling objects (like a tree or hail). If you're financing or leasing your car, your lender likely requires comprehensive coverage. If you own your vehicle outright, it's an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
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