Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
There are some characteristics of a third-party car accident claim that are universal. First and foremost, a third-party claim does not involve a contractual obligation between the injured party and the insurance company. This sounds more complicated than it really is. Simply put, a third-party claim is the legal name for making a claim on another’s auto insurance policy. Exactly how and when such claims can be made vary based upon the presence (or lack thereof) of no-fault laws, but the overriding principle remains constant.

The coverage offered under a third party liability insurance appears exceptionally cost-effective and rewarding in terms of its cost and premium rate. Even if you have to use this as either an essential or an add-on part of the main policy, it benefits you fully. However, at the time of calculating the compensation amount, insured’s annual income is considered.
When an insurance company enters into a reinsurance contract with another insurance company, then the same is called treaty reinsurance. Description: In the case of treaty reinsurance, the company that sells the insurance policies to another insurance company is called ceding company. Reinsurance frees up the capital of the ceding company and helps augment the solvency margin. It also enables
Comprehensive insurance is a coverage that helps pay to replace or repair your vehicle if it's stolen or damaged in an incident that's not a collision. Comprehensive typically covers damage from fire, vandalism or falling objects (like a tree or hail). If you're financing or leasing your car, your lender likely requires comprehensive coverage. If you own your vehicle outright, it's an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
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