Mark was driving on the highway and all of a sudden a rock hit the windshield and created a crack. As soon as Mark got home, he called his insurance representative and was told that he didn't need to worry, he had comprehensive coverage which may help to repair or replace a broken or shattered windshield, he may only have to pay his deductible and the rest would be covered.
Third-party insurance is a type of insurance plan bought to safeguard against the claims to another. In this category of motor insurance, the third-party will cover for the fiscal liability that is incurred by the owner of the car in the event of unforeseen demise or permanent disability of the third party, which was crashed by the vehicle of the policyholder in an accident.
Making a claim with “the other driver’s” insurance company? That’s a third-party claim. Driving a company car and sustain an injury? You’re making a third-party claim there, too. Injured while driving your own car in the course of your job? A third-party claim with your employer’s insurance company would be your mechanism for recovery of medical and repair costs. Any claim made to an insurance company other than your own is considered a third-party claim.
No states require comprehensive coverage, but those who finance or lease their car will probably find that their lender or lessee requires it. Lenders and lessees are the official owners of the vehicle, so they want to make sure they're adequately protected in case of an incident. For the same reasons, you'll rarely be able to buy comprehensive insurance without also purchasing bodily injury liability and collision coverages.
One of the best ways to get cheap car insurance is by comparing car insurance quotes — and the companies offering them. To get you started, NerdWallet looked at car insurance prices across the country for different driver profiles and coverage levels to find the cheapest rates. We’ve sliced the data in several ways to give you an idea of average costs and what factors might nudge your car insurance rate up — or even better, down.
The legal liability of the insured person is covered under the third-party insurance policy in the case of disability or demise of the third party, and any damage or loss to the property of the third party. The third-party liability policy takes care of the financial and legal burden in such circumstances. Despite the fact that the direct beneficiary is neither the insurance company nor the insurer, but a third party, this is the most crucial benefit that a third party insurance secures for the owner or the driver of the insured vehicle.
Third-party claims occur with less frequency in no-fault car insurance states, where you first look to your own insurance company to recover, regardless of who is actually at fault for an accident or injury. Generally, no-fault states have mandatory minimum insurance requirements, meaning that every driver carries a statutorily dictated minimum amount of insurance. If, after you’ve made the appropriate claims to your own insurance company, your claim meets your state's monetary threshold or "serious injury" threshold for stepping outside of no-fault, you may be able to initiate a third-party claim.
In most countries, third-party or liability insurance is compulsory insurance for any party that may potentially be sued by a third party. Public liability insurance involves industries or businesses that take part in processes or other activities that may affect third parties, such as subcontractors, architects, and engineers. Here, the third-party can be visitors, guests, or users of a facility. Most companies include public liability insurance in their insurance portfolio to protect against damage to property or personal injury.
Cash in on major life changes. Certain life events could translate to cheaper car insurance, so shop for quotes whenever something major changes in your life. For instance, many companies offer a lower rate for married couples or domestic partners. Or perhaps you moved to a suburb with lower accident and crime rates. If your risk for accidents goes down, your rates just might, too.
If you live in an area prone to car theft and vandalism, you'll probably sleep easier with comprehensive coverage at your side. Though car theft numbers have steadily decreased over the last several years in the U.S. — actually dipping below 700,000 reported cases in 2013 for the first time since 1967, and remaining at those levels the years following — the odds are still less than encouraging.

Embedded value is the sum of the net asset value and present value of future profits of a life insurance company. Description: This measure considers future profits from existing business only, and ignores the possibility of introduction of new policies and hence profits from those are not taken into account. Also See: Insurance, Riders, Annualized Premium, Return, Beneficiary, Annuity, Insurabl

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Comprehensive car insurance covers damages from an "act of God," or events that are not caused by a car driving into something else. An "act of God" can include things like damage from a heavy tree branch falling on your car. Since you have no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car, this kind of accident would be covered under your comprehensive policy.
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