Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which control coverage determinations. Such terms may vary by state, and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.


Under a settlement option, the maturity amount entitled to a life insurance policyholder is paid in structured periodic installments (up to a certain stipulated period of time post maturity) instead of a 'lump-sum' payout. Such a payout needs to be intimated to the insurer in advance by the insured. The primary objective of settlement option is to generate regular streams of income for the insured
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
A third-party claim of this type can be very simple or extremely complex depending upon the facts and injuries of a particular accident. If fault is not in question, insurance adjusters will normally attempt to resolve third-party claims quickly and with a minimal expenditure of time. Normally a few brief interviews, a cursory review of medical records or repair records and a thorough understanding of any law enforcement reports will result in an offer of settlement. However, in cases where fault is disputed, or where injuries are significant, the road to recovery can get bumpy in a hurry.

Third-party insurance is a type of insurance plan bought to safeguard against the claims to another. In this category of motor insurance, the third-party will cover for the fiscal liability that is incurred by the owner of the car in the event of unforeseen demise or permanent disability of the third party, which was crashed by the vehicle of the policyholder in an accident.


Third-party insurance is an insurance policy purchased for protection against the claims of another. One of the most common types is third-party insurance is automobile insurance. Third-party offers coverage against claims of damages and losses incurred by a driver who is not the insured, the principal, and is therefore not covered under the insurance policy. The driver who caused damages is the third party.

Embedded value is the sum of the net asset value and present value of future profits of a life insurance company. Description: This measure considers future profits from existing business only, and ignores the possibility of introduction of new policies and hence profits from those are not taken into account. Also See: Insurance, Riders, Annualized Premium, Return, Beneficiary, Annuity, Insurabl
Most common comprehensive claims: Glass claims and then accidents with deer are the most common. If you live in Arizona or another desert state, you're at a much higher risk for glass claims as rocks are frequently kicked up by cars. Deer accidents are most common in West Virginia and other central/non-coastal states, specifically if you live and drive in a highly wooded area.
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