There are some characteristics of a third-party car accident claim that are universal. First and foremost, a third-party claim does not involve a contractual obligation between the injured party and the insurance company. This sounds more complicated than it really is. Simply put, a third-party claim is the legal name for making a claim on another’s auto insurance policy. Exactly how and when such claims can be made vary based upon the presence (or lack thereof) of no-fault laws, but the overriding principle remains constant.

No states require comprehensive coverage, but those who finance or lease their car will probably find that their lender or lessee requires it. Lenders and lessees are the official owners of the vehicle, so they want to make sure they're adequately protected in case of an incident. For the same reasons, you'll rarely be able to buy comprehensive insurance without also purchasing bodily injury liability and collision coverages.

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Making a third-party car accident claim can be as simple as writing a letter. If you believe you have a valid third-party car accident claim, contact the responsible insurance company via telephone as soon as possible to inform them of the claim (you should have taken down the other driver's insurance policy information at the car accident scene). This is called “giving notice” and is often overlooked. Proper, prompt notice can mean the difference between recovery and walking away empty-handed.

Pet Insurance is issued by The Hollard Insurance Company Pty Ltd (ACN 090 584 473; AFSL 241436) (Hollard); distributed by Pet Insurance Pty Ltd (ACN 607 160 930; AR 1234944) (PIPL) and PIPL's authorised distribution partners (including Platform Ventures Pty Ltd (ABN 626 745 177; AR 001266101) (Ventures) under the AAMI brand); and administered by PetSure (Australia) Pty Ltd (ACN 075 949 923; AFSL 420183) (PetSure). PIPL and Ventures are authorised representatives of PetSure. PIPL and PIPL's authorised distribution partners (including Ventures) will receive a commission which is a percentage of the premium paid to Hollard and PetSure may receive a portion of the underwriting profit, if any - ask PetSure for more details.
No states require comprehensive coverage, but those who finance or lease their car will probably find that their lender or lessee requires it. Lenders and lessees are the official owners of the vehicle, so they want to make sure they're adequately protected in case of an incident. For the same reasons, you'll rarely be able to buy comprehensive insurance without also purchasing bodily injury liability and collision coverages.
You can then select from third-party only cover, third-party fire and theft cover or comprehensive cover to filter the results. It’s also a good idea to filter and compare by monthly and annual costs, because a monthly payment cycle could see you pay more than you might with a one-off yearly payment – once you factor in the interest that gets added on to your repayments.
We want to hear from you and encourage a lively discussion among our users. Please help us keep our site clean and safe by following our posting guidelines, and avoid disclosing personal or sensitive information such as bank account or phone numbers. Any comments posted under NerdWallet's official account are not reviewed or endorsed by representatives of financial institutions affiliated with the reviewed products, unless explicitly stated otherwise.
You can then select from third-party only cover, third-party fire and theft cover or comprehensive cover to filter the results. It’s also a good idea to filter and compare by monthly and annual costs, because a monthly payment cycle could see you pay more than you might with a one-off yearly payment – once you factor in the interest that gets added on to your repayments.
You’ll then be able to order the results by price to see how much you’ll be paying for what level of cover, and which voluntary and compulsory excess fees you might need to pay for each policy. You’ll also be able to see any insurance features and extras that can be included, such as legal expenses, personal accident, windscreen cover, breakdown cover and the cost of hiring a courtesy car.
A business owners policy combines a variety of coverages into one policy that offers comprehensive protection to business owners. One of the major components of such a policy is third-party liability, which protects your business should it cause harm to others. This coverage not only applies to customer slips and falls in your store, but also to damage from defective products, incorrect installation and harm caused by one of your employees.
Most common comprehensive claims: Glass claims and then accidents with deer are the most common. If you live in Arizona or another desert state, you're at a much higher risk for glass claims as rocks are frequently kicked up by cars. Deer accidents are most common in West Virginia and other central/non-coastal states, specifically if you live and drive in a highly wooded area.
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