Third-party insurance is a type of insurance plan bought to safeguard against the claims to another. In this category of motor insurance, the third-party will cover for the fiscal liability that is incurred by the owner of the car in the event of unforeseen demise or permanent disability of the third party, which was crashed by the vehicle of the policyholder in an accident.
Detail how the accident occurred, the injuries or damages you’ve sustained and (if applicable) the dollar amount you are claiming. Gather relevant records related to the car accident, be they medical bills, repair estimates, or police reports. Give the insurance adjuster all the reasons in the world to pay out on your claim. You may wish to retain an attorney to assist you with making the claim if you are uncomfortable doing it yourself, or if things get particularly contentious.
Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
You’ll then be able to order the results by price to see how much you’ll be paying for what level of cover, and which voluntary and compulsory excess fees you might need to pay for each policy. You’ll also be able to see any insurance features and extras that can be included, such as legal expenses, personal accident, windscreen cover, breakdown cover and the cost of hiring a courtesy car.
As required by law, drivers must carry at least a minimal amount of bodily injury liability and property damage liability coverage. A few states do not require both or have other limitations. Each state sets its minimum requirement for each type of coverage. Even in “no-fault” states, liability coverage is all but essential. No-fault laws were established to reduce or eliminate ordinary injury lawsuits affixed with low-dollar price tags and an overwhelming number of claims for pain and suffering. Still, no-fault laws do not protect the insured from million-dollar injury lawsuits stemming from seriously injured third parties. Both types of third-party insurance are important, specifically for individuals, such as homeowners, with substantial assets to protect. The more money and assets an insured has, the higher the limit should be for each type of liability coverage.

No states require comprehensive coverage, but those who finance or lease their car will probably find that their lender or lessee requires it. Lenders and lessees are the official owners of the vehicle, so they want to make sure they're adequately protected in case of an incident. For the same reasons, you'll rarely be able to buy comprehensive insurance without also purchasing bodily injury liability and collision coverages.


There are some characteristics of a third-party car accident claim that are universal. First and foremost, a third-party claim does not involve a contractual obligation between the injured party and the insurance company. This sounds more complicated than it really is. Simply put, a third-party claim is the legal name for making a claim on another’s auto insurance policy. Exactly how and when such claims can be made vary based upon the presence (or lack thereof) of no-fault laws, but the overriding principle remains constant.
Most common comprehensive claims: Glass claims and then accidents with deer are the most common. If you live in Arizona or another desert state, you're at a much higher risk for glass claims as rocks are frequently kicked up by cars. Deer accidents are most common in West Virginia and other central/non-coastal states, specifically if you live and drive in a highly wooded area.
×