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Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
Product liability insurance is typically mandated by legislation, the scale of which varies by country and often varies by industry. This type of insurance covers all major product classes and types, including chemicals, agricultural products, and recreational equipment; and protects companies against lawsuits over products or components that cause damage or injury.

The cost of a comprehensive cover is several times that of a stand-alone third-party cover, since damage claims are more frequent than third-party claims. Until now, the premium for motor third-party insurance was calculated on the basis of a schedule of rates provided by the Tariff Advisory Committee, an arm of IRDA, the insurance regulator. But IRDA has done away with the motor tariff. The compensation to the victim is largely decided by the earning capacity of the accident victim.

Embedded value is the sum of the net asset value and present value of future profits of a life insurance company. Description: This measure considers future profits from existing business only, and ignores the possibility of introduction of new policies and hence profits from those are not taken into account. Also See: Insurance, Riders, Annualized Premium, Return, Beneficiary, Annuity, Insurabl


AAMI Life Insurance, AAMI Income Protection and Accidental Injury Insurance are issued by Asteron Life & Superannuation Limited ABN 87 073 979 530, AFSL 229880 (Asteron) other than the Redundancy Benefit which is issued by AAI Limited ABN 48 005 297 807, AFSL 230859 (AAI) trading as AAMI which is  part of the Suncorp Group. Asteron is part of the TAL Dai-ichi Life Australia Pty Limited ABN 97 150 070 483 group of companies (TAL). Asteron is authorised to use the AAMI brand. The different entities of TAL and Suncorp are not responsible for, or liable in respect of, products and services provided by the other. AAI trading as AAMI does not provide any financial product advice in relation to AAMI Life Insurance, Accidental Injury and Income Protection (except in relation to the Redundancy Benefit) (Life Products). Any advice on this page in connection with the Life Products is general in nature and is provided by Platform Ventures Pty Ltd ABN 35 626 745 177 AFS Representative Number 001266101 (PV). PV is part of the Suncorp Group and an authorised representative of TAL Direct Pty Limited ABN 39 084 666 017, AFSL 243260 (TAL Direct).
The cheapest car insurance, period, will likely carry the minimum coverage required in your state. In most states, this is liability insurance only, which covers property damage and medical bills for others due to accidents you cause. Some states also require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, which pay for your injuries or damage if an at-fault driver doesn’t have enough insurance.
If your car is worth more than $3,000 and/or is less than 10 years old, we'd also suggest both collision and comprehensive coverage, too. Our estimates suggest drivers can buy comprehensive and collision insurance for an average of $600 to $700 per year (however, the cost may be higher for some cars), so you would spend $3,000 to $3,500 in premiums over five years. If your car is currently worth less than $3,000, you will have spent more on insurance than your car is worth. You can obtain the estimated value of your car from sites like Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds. Once you have both the value and a quote for coverage, you can determine whether collision insurance will be worth it.
How much you pay for comprehensive insurance coverage is determined differently than for basic coverages like property damage and personal injury liability. With those coverages, the amount of protection you buy dictates the cost. The cost of comprehensive insurance coverage, on the other hand, varies depending on the deductible you select. The higher the deductible, the less you'll spend on your premium — but the more you'll spend out of pocket if you file a claim.
Actual cash value equals the purchase price of your car minus depreciation and your deductible. So comprehensive coverage will pay an amount up to the actual cash value of your car to either repair or (in the case of a total loss) replace it. If the cost of repairs exceeds your car's ACV, your car insurance company will declare it a total loss and pay the sum of the car's ACV to help you replace it — unless you opt to retain salvage (i.e., keep the totaled car), in which case the salvage value will also be deducted from your payout.
As per the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988, 'Third Party Insurance' is a statutory requirement. The idea of the third party comes from the fact that the prime beneficiary of the policy is neither the original insured nor the insurance company, but a pretentious third party. As per the rules, the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA) of India compute the damages.

Our data shows that 7% of Progressive drivers with comprehensive coverage have a comprehensive claim in a given year, and the average repair is about $1,400. Without comprehensive, that's how much you may have to pay out of pocket. Keep in mind, repair costs can vary widely based on your damage and how much your car is worth. Typically more expensive cars cost more to repair.

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