No. Third-Party Car Insurance is obligatory for all motor vehicles. Third party risk insurance is compulsory under the statute of the Indian Motor Vehicles Act, 1988. You may be a good driver, but it does not negate the fact, that the vehicle you drive can become the victim of a disaster that was caused by another vehicle. In such a situation, you will be grateful that the driver involved has a third-party car insurance cover that you can raise a claim on.
As per the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988, 'Third Party Insurance' is a statutory requirement. The idea of the third party comes from the fact that the prime beneficiary of the policy is neither the original insured nor the insurance company, but a pretentious third party. As per the rules, the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA) of India compute the damages.
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NerdWallet compared quotes from these insurers in ZIP codes across the country. Rates are for policies that include liability, collision, comprehensive, and uninsured/underinsured motorist coverages, as well as any other coverage required in each state. Our “good driver” profile is a 40-year-old with no moving violations and credit in the “good” tier.
Third Party Car Insurance is a risk cover, under which the insurer compensates any legal liabilities claimed by the other party, in case the insured vehicle is at fault. However, as per the Motor Vehicles Act 1988, Section 146, plying an uninsured vehicle on Indian roads is an offence. This is why liability insurance is also known as ‘Act Only’ plan. This plan doesn’t cover the insured or his car.

Risk assessment, also called underwriting, is the methodology used by insurers for evaluating and assessing the risks associated with an insurance policy. The same helps in calculation of the correct premium for an insured. Description: There are different kinds of risks associated with insurance like changes in mortality rates, morbidity rates, catastrophic risk, etc. This assessment is impleme
Third-party claims are much more prevalent in “fault” states than in “no-fault” states. While no-fault generally require an injured party to first recover from their own insurance company, fault states have no such requirement. In fault states, if you sustain an injury to your person or damage to your vehicle in a car accident you can make a claim with “the other driver’s” insurance company -- provided they were at fault for the accident.

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You can then select from third-party only cover, third-party fire and theft cover or comprehensive cover to filter the results. It’s also a good idea to filter and compare by monthly and annual costs, because a monthly payment cycle could see you pay more than you might with a one-off yearly payment – once you factor in the interest that gets added on to your repayments.
One of the most common third-party claims in no-fault states is the “mini-tort” claim. In no-fault states such as Michigan, “mini-tort” laws allow you to claim a small, statutorily-mandated amount of money from “the other driver’s” insurance company. Most no-fault insurers will require you to collect the mini-tort amount to offset whatever they are obligated to pay. Another common instance of a third-party claim in a no-fault state is an employment-related claim. Injuries or damages sustained in the course of your job or in a company vehicle often result in third-party claims.
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Pretty much all drivers are subject to the risks mentioned above, so the short answer to the question is, "Almost everybody." Take animal collisions, for example. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, there are more than 1.5 million deer-vehicle collisions every year, resulting in over $1 billion in vehicle damage — and that's just deer-vehicle collisions.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
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