Being in the business for a very long time, I have found that most people are clueless about insurance, even most agents who sell them. I will agree that their rates are cheap. But I wouldn’t recommend them. Inexperienced adjusters. They do not fully investigate. The policy does not cover like, kind, and quality which is bad if you have a new vehicle.
But in some cases, a separate policy might make sense for your young driver. Say a parent recently was convicted of a DUI or multiple moving violations — a corresponding rate increase could be even higher if a teen driver is added to the parent's policy. Or if your teen is lucky enough to drive a high-end vehicle or sports car, insurance premiums might be too high to justify adding them to your own policy.
"Teens are very likely to pick up the habits of their parents,” says J.C. Fawcett of the Defensive Driving School. “A parent should think about. Do I cuss at other drivers while driving? Do I speed? Do I tailgate? The training that comes from students observing their parents is very powerful. If a parent attempts to change their habits only when their teen is learning to drive, it's probably 10 years too late."
I just switched from State Farm to Nationwide and State Farm was reasonable, though I wasn't necessarily happy with the coverage. It was only $79 a month for full coverage, but they didn't have accident forgiveness, if I got into an accident, I would have to pay 20% of the rental fee for a car, and the lowest deductible for collision they will go is $250. I switched to Nationwide a week ago and the quote was for $70 a month, (every little bit counts) but the big difference is the coverage. I got accident forgiveness included, also they pay 100% of car rental fee, and I only have $100 deductible for collision. However they do have $0 deductible but 100 I can do. This is for a 2011 Ford Focus which Focuses are generally cheap to insure.
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In a best-case scenario, you’ll never have to use your car insurance. After all, making a claim on your auto insurance means you’ve suffered some sort of loss, and no one wants that. However, going through life without ever having a fender bender or other damage to your car is unlikely. In some cases, you’ll be making a car insurance claim after a harrowing experience, like a serious accident. After going through something like that, you want to be sure your insurance company isn’t going to make things worse.
If you’re going off to school but your car won’t be coming along for the journey, you should ask your family insurance agent about a lower premium. If you’re not driving the vehicle year-round, then there’s no reason you should have to pay top dollar for year-round coverage. But definitely don’t just cancel your policy – you want to make sure that if your vehicle is stolen or damaged by an act of nature (or vandals) that you are covered.
Plans vary greatly. But the general rule of thumb is that the less you pay per month, the higher your deductible is. Higher premiums are usually associated with lower deductibles. Generally it is beneficial for those with existing health issues to opt to pay more per month and less out-of-pocket for services. Those in good health often opt for a high deductible option in hopes that they never have to actually pay the deductible but would mostly be covered if something major happened. A prescription plan is another important consideration. If you need to take medications regularly you'll want to choose a plan with a good prescription plan. If you need to insure your entire family, you'll want to look at family deductibles and maximums. Only full-coverage options will satisfy the minimal essential health care insurance required to get around paying the fine.

Even if the open-enrollment period has passed for signing up for insurance via one of the exchanges, you might still be able to purchase subsidized insurance if you've had a qualifying life event. Qualifying events include moving to a new state, change in income, change in family, loss of coverage and others. You may even be able to apply simply because you did not understand that open-enrollment ended or you did not understand the health care law. If your income qualifies you for subsidized health care, you'll want to purchase through your state exchange.
Everything’s bigger in Texas and car insurance coverage is no exception. In fact, the Lone Star State has some of the highest minimum requirements in the nation and, even then, these may not be enough when an accident strikes. As it currently stands with Texas, in the event of an accident, there’s a 1 in 7 chance that the other driver won’t be insured. Unless you’ve purchased uninsured/underinsured motorist (UM/UIM) coverage, that’s money out of your pocket. Texas’s minimum requirements also don’t account for comprehensive coverage which you’ll definitely want to take into consideration since the state ranks first for monetary losses from “catastrophes” like hail storms and hurricanes.
BTW regarding the wreck- do NOT talk to the other insurance company- the @ fault driver’s insurance company. You’re not required if you have a lawyer. Get a lawyer!! Call them from the hospital if you have to they’ll come to you @ the hospital if you call them there. They’ll even come out to your house. Please don’t let the insurance company screw you. You just want what’s fair & your property covered fairly.
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