In the 2018 midterm elections, ballot measures passed in both Missouri and Utah legalizing the use of medical marijuana. This means that in total, 32 states and Washington D.C. now allow for the medicinal use of cannabis. So can you use your health insurance to help pay for it? Due to the U.S. government's classification of the plant as a Schedule I drug, you can't use Medicare to pay for medical marijuana because it technically doesn't have any accepted medical use. Private insurers won’t cover it either, partially because the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it for use. If you’re outside of the U.S. you’ll have more luck. With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Canada in 2018, Sun Life Financial is now offering plans that cover medical marijuana use.
It's important to be vigilant in looking for red flags when shopping for health insurance online. Even companies with legitimate-looking websites can be fraudulent. For instance, a Florida-based private health insurance company was shut down in fall 2018 for selling worthless plans to consumers and collecting more than $100 million in profits, according to the Federal Trade Commission. People paid as much as $500 per month for what was just a medical discount program, not insurance. The Coalition Against Insurance Fraud says con artists are exploiting general confusion over healthcare reform, so here are some of its tips to avoid getting ripped off.
When I talked to the employees at 21st Century Insurance, they don't talk at me, they talk to me just like they would any other person. They look past the bottom line dollar signs and see me as an individual; a lot of insurance companies today can't seem to deliver that. I think it's obnoxious when a company becomes so big that they don't treat the customers as people anymore or when companies become so large that the employees become impersonal and arrogant. So far, I've not encountered this with 21st Century Insurance and that, my friends, leaves me a satisfied customer!
Even if the open-enrollment period has passed for signing up for insurance via one of the exchanges, you might still be able to purchase subsidized insurance if you've had a qualifying life event. Qualifying events include moving to a new state, change in income, change in family, loss of coverage and others. You may even be able to apply simply because you did not understand that open-enrollment ended or you did not understand the health care law. If your income qualifies you for subsidized health care, you'll want to purchase through your state exchange.
Liberty Mutual just dropped my family because of two claims that were made on my daughters car. She had her car at school freshmen year and It was parked and hit on the rear corner closest to the road. It wasn’t her fault and no one came forward to admit to the accident. She no longer has a car at school, and drives rarely when she’s home. The second accident was when she was pulling out of the carport and her front bumper caught a wooden railing when she was backing out. That was her fault, but an accident. Isn’t that why we have insurance????? Before I got this letter from Liberty mutual, I sang their praises. I will loudly have bad things to say from now on. Don’t count on Liberty Mutual
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