I was with AAA for the longest time in my life, promised to lower my premium, but when it was time to put out they said that's our best price for 2 cars and my home around 2k. I called AARP ( Hartford insurance) and they gave me a price of $1,200 LOTS of savings for the same coverage. Then I had one car left and wanted a price from AAA $3,200 just for 1 car and Hartford $740. Are these insurance for real! Apparently only Hartford is not greedy FOR THE SAME COVERAGE. When I had an accident about 5 months ago (not my fault) State Farm had a max coverage of 25K in Vegas ( you guys watch out for this) was told to get the initial sum from Hartford -NO PROBLEM very nice and followed up all my problems. My advice all you 50 year olds try and contact Hartford and ask, you have nothing to lose.
High Income: Those with a high income are facing a different problem. Many who have high incomes didn't purchase insurance in the past; they just paid health care expenses as needed. Paying two percent of a high income for the penalty can be a rather large sum for high-income persons. In this case, it might be cheaper to just buy qualifying health insurance. If you are in good health, you might want to choose the lowest qualifying plan. If you have ongoing health issues, you may as well bite the bullet and choose a more exhaustive plan and lower your out-of-pocket expenses.
Hi Stephen – I think you’re doing the right thing – as long as the premium continues to be reasonable compared to the competition. Even though we obsess on low rates, quality of service matters. It does little good if you get the cheapest policy, then they stick you when you have a claim. With must auto claims there’s going to be a human error factor (especially with new drivers), and you can’t be with companies that will hold that against you to such a degree that it seems like they no longer want your business.
Bad auto insurance comes in many forms. With bad car insurance, premiums are higher than they should be, or the company offers low premiums but minimal coverage. Some car insurance companies have poor customer service and don’t effectively communicate the status of your auto insurance claim. Others require you to use only repair shops that they approve of, and those shops can be inconvenient to access, forcing you to travel across town for repairs or wait weeks for an appointment. Still other auto insurance companies don’t have a comprehensive network of adjusters, so you have to wait longer for your claim to be processed so you can get the repairs you need. In a worst-case scenario, a car insurance company may not have the financial resources to pay claims, leaving its customers high and dry.
Which companies have the cheapest auto insurance rates in Austin, Texas? We suggest 30 year old drivers in Austin compare quotes starting at Texas Farm Bureau, Progressive, and GEICO. Auto insurance in Austin can cost drivers $2,191 a year, which is about 6% less than average in the Lone Star state. These three companies, however, have car insurance rates 44% less than the Austin average.

I have been with Geico for 10 years, what kept me with them is that my daughter had just graduated high school and started college she asked to borrow the car because she was late for school, I said yes she got into a fender bender. Geico paid the claim and they even asked its my choice to add my daughter to my policy or not. Insurance only went up by $30 dollars a month.
I was with Liberty Mutual for about 15 years and was very satisfied with their prices and service, although I never filed a claim. When I retired and moved from California to Florida, my auto rate went up a ridiculous amount, to almost $10,000 a year even though I had no accidents and one minor moving violation in the last ten years. On top of that, Liberty Mutual screwed up my umbrella policy and told me it was “unenforceable,” whatever that means, but I had to pay for the policy anyway up to the time I canceled and switched to Progressive, which cost about one third the cost of Liberty Mutual for an identical policy. Even good companies change over time.
×