Next, take a good hard look at your driving record and credit report, and clean both up if they’re not in good shape. Moving violations, citations for driving under the influence, accidents, and a low credit score all tell car insurance companies you’re at higher risk of being in an accident, making a claim, and costing them money. Some car insurance companies will give you a discount if you can prove you’re a safe driver by installing a tracking device in your car, which can lead to lower rates over time (however, if the tracker shows you routinely drive in an unsafe manner, your rates might go up). A few years without a citation or an accident, as well as a steadily improving credit score, can help you save on car insurance.
Non-owner car insurance is just what it sounds like. It’s insurance that covers the driver instead of the car. That is, if you don’t own a car, but frequently drive a friend’s car, rental cars, work cars, or use a car-sharing service, non-owner insurance covers your liability in the event of an accident. It can cover your liability for medical costs and property damage. In some states, non-owner car insurance can also help you regain your license after it’s been suspended. It can also lower car insurance rates if you buy a car later since there won’t be an uninsured period on your record. |
How much car insurance you need depends on how much coverage you are legally obligated to get, as well as how much coverage you need for your situation. Each state has certain legal requirements for car insurance, and not meeting them can result in negative consequences. Check out our car insurance state guides to see the legal car insurance minimums in your state.
At Progressive, drivers' rates drop by an average of 10% when they turn 18 and another 16% at 21. As your teenager becomes more experienced and avoids tickets and accidents, the price should keep going down. Remember, teen drivers are also eligible for the Good Student Discount and can participate in Progressive's Snapshot® program, which decreases the rate for safe, low mileage drivers.†

Gap insurance is insurance that may be required if you lease or finance a car. Gap insurance covers the difference between what your car is worth and what you owe on your auto loan should your car be a total loss in an incident. For example, let’s say you have a car loan with a balance of $20,000, but your car is only worth $15,000. If it’s totaled in an accident, your insurance will only pay out $15,000 and you will owe $5,000 to settle your loan. If you have gap insurance, that policy will pay the $5,000 to settle your loan balance.
But in some cases, a separate policy might make sense for your young driver. Say a parent recently was convicted of a DUI or multiple moving violations — a corresponding rate increase could be even higher if a teen driver is added to the parent's policy. Or if your teen is lucky enough to drive a high-end vehicle or sports car, insurance premiums might be too high to justify adding them to your own policy.
The level of cover – You would normally get really affordable car insurance cover with third party only insurance. Your next cheapest would be third party, fire and theft; followed by fully comprehensive being the most expensive.  However before you opt for this lower level of coverage in an effort to reduce your premium, it is worthwhile also to try to get a quote for comprehensive. Surprisingly, we have actually managed to get lower or the same premiums for fully comprehensive when compared to third party fire and theft during some of our tests.
Low Income: If your income is 100 to 400 percent of the national poverty rate ($11,490 - $45,960) for a single person, you may qualify for subsidized health insurance. In many cases this is not free health insurance but subsidized. This means you can get bronze-level health insurance for about $2570 per year through one of the state exchanges. Extremely low-income individuals and elderly persons often qualify for Medicare. If you paid the fine for 2014 you may still qualify for insurance via an exchange, even if it is not during the open-enrollment period, to avoid the fee in 2015.

$3,854/year ($321/month) To get these figures, we averaged rates for 40-year-olds with one recent at-fault crash and the typical "full coverage" insurance. Your rates will remain high for three to five years after you cause an accident or have a moving violation. If you fall into this category, be sure to shop for new insurance rates just after the three-year and five-year anniversaries of your infraction.
Like the others on this list, Nationwide offers a good student discount. But it also offers accident forgiveness even for teen drivers, ensuring rates won’t increase even more after the first at-fault accident. They also offer 24/7 roadside assistance. If you’re willing to have your driving monitored at all times, their SmartRide program can qualify you for some steep discounts after a year of use. You can also combine discounts on a family plan, so if your parents qualify for a discount for being accident-free, you will, too.
Even if the open-enrollment period has passed for signing up for insurance via one of the exchanges, you might still be able to purchase subsidized insurance if you've had a qualifying life event. Qualifying events include moving to a new state, change in income, change in family, loss of coverage and others. You may even be able to apply simply because you did not understand that open-enrollment ended or you did not understand the health care law. If your income qualifies you for subsidized health care, you'll want to purchase through your state exchange.
If you live in Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, or Wisconsin, you should definitely call an Erie agent. It is easily one of the most affordable companies for teen and college-aged drivers. They offer discounts of up to 20 percent for drivers who live at home and are under 21, for each year they spend under the same policy, for taking a driving class, and even for participating in their competitive program that offers prizes to students who are the most engaged with safe driving. Neat, huh?
But in some cases, a separate policy might make sense for your young driver. Say a parent recently was convicted of a DUI or multiple moving violations — a corresponding rate increase could be even higher if a teen driver is added to the parent's policy. Or if your teen is lucky enough to drive a high-end vehicle or sports car, insurance premiums might be too high to justify adding them to your own policy.

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I have been a GEICO customer for about least 15 years. Claims and customer service are not the issue with them. After said years of faithfully paying my insurance on time and renewing each year I accidently back into a car in my driveway. The cars were repaired without incident. However, GEICO penalized me by taking away my good driver discount and increase my monthly insurance rate by nearly $100.00 ; leving a hefty penalty for making a claim. I can’t imagine the money they made off of me during the 15 years I’ve faithfully paid auto insurance. I am hunting for a new auto insurance carrier since GEICO obviously thinks driving is perfect and accidents never happen.
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