Although we’re sure that you’re probably an excellent driver (you would never speed or cut someone off, would you?), and an even better parent, how are you as a teacher? Many driving school instructors have been teaching student drivers for decades, and we all know teenagers are more likely to listen to literally anyone else than take instruction from their parents.

Becoming a licensed driver can seem overwhelming. Buying a car and getting it insured is a lot of responsibility. If you’re over 18, a licensed driver and have the funds available to purchase a vehicle (and insurance coverage), you’re definitely free and clear to do so. But if you’re a younger teen, just having a license and the cash isn’t enough. In most states, minors aren’t allowed to own property on their own, and you must recruit a parent (or other trusted adult) to co-sign your purchase. When in doubt, consult your state’s DMV.
If you’re going off to school but your car won’t be coming along for the journey, you should ask your family insurance agent about a lower premium. If you’re not driving the vehicle year-round, then there’s no reason you should have to pay top dollar for year-round coverage. But definitely don’t just cancel your policy – you want to make sure that if your vehicle is stolen or damaged by an act of nature (or vandals) that you are covered.
Hi Eric – What you’ve seen is not an unusual situation. A company that’s good in one state isn’t in another. Liberty Mutual worked for you in California, but not in Florida. This is why it’s not possible to say one company is the best. That will vary by state and by your own personal profile. That’s why we produce these “10 Best” lists, to give you companies to investigate.
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