As your policy price will often depend on the level of cover you choose to take out, it's important to decide whether you want to take out Comprehensive, Third Party, Fire and Theft, or Third Party cover. Being able to determine what type of cover is the best for you will help to speed up the comparison process and will make it easier to find a very cheap car insurance quote.


Liability insurance covers you if you’re in an accident deemed to be your fault. It will cover repairs to damaged property, as well as medical bills resulting from injury to the other driver and his or her passengers. Most states require at least a minimum amount of liability insurance, but it’s a good idea to purchase extra protection if you can afford it.
The level of cover – You would normally get really affordable car insurance cover with third party only insurance. Your next cheapest would be third party, fire and theft; followed by fully comprehensive being the most expensive.  However before you opt for this lower level of coverage in an effort to reduce your premium, it is worthwhile also to try to get a quote for comprehensive. Surprisingly, we have actually managed to get lower or the same premiums for fully comprehensive when compared to third party fire and theft during some of our tests.
When you apply for auto insurance in Texas, providers are legally required to offer $2,500 in Personal Injury Protection coverage (PIP). This type of coverage is mandated in so-called “no-fault” states, but it’s optional in Texas (although you do have to refuse it in writing). If you select it, 100% of the coverage amount will be available for your medical bills following an accident, regardless of who was at fault. While you may be covered under your own health insurance for those costs, PIP has the added benefit of covering up to 80% of your lost income if you’re unable to work following an accident. It’s a nice protection, but keep in mind that $2,500 won’t go that far in such a case. While most companies will let you raise the limit, it’s one of the costlier options to add, so if you’re on a budget you’ll have to weigh its value against things like comprehensive and UM/UIM coverage.
Risking your policy perks: If your child causes an accident or gets multiple moving violations, you could see a rate increase and lose policy perks like the Good Driver discount or the Claim-Free discount. You might also have to pay out of pocket for damage your teen causes that exceed your coverage amounts. (For this reason, make sure you have adequate limits when insuring any freshly licensed family members.)

I am glad to see USAA at the bottom; but it should not be on the list at all. I am currently going through a claim with them (total loss, I got rear ended, pushed into the car in front of me and they hit the car in front of them; not at fault). I have all correspondence recorded and proof of them lying to me, and using made up regulations to justify it. When asked for the reference for said regulations, I am ignored. I have been throwing WAC at them, quote after quote as to how they are being unruly. This was in December, it is now April and they have YET to give me a valuation report in compliance with WAC. I will be more than happy to provide a copy of our correspondence (with PII edited, obviously), proving how bad USAA is at customer service and how willing they are to break the rules if it benefits them. Email me if you want to see it. I finally had enough and contacted the Washington State Insurance Commissioner; USAA has until the middle of this month to respond to them… We will see what happens next.
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