If you’re going off to school but your car won’t be coming along for the journey, you should ask your family insurance agent about a lower premium. If you’re not driving the vehicle year-round, then there’s no reason you should have to pay top dollar for year-round coverage. But definitely don’t just cancel your policy – you want to make sure that if your vehicle is stolen or damaged by an act of nature (or vandals) that you are covered.
While laws vary from state to state, it's generally required that your teen have at least a learners permit before they can legally hit the road (with a licensed adult in the passenger seat). While they might not need their own insurance if they've only got a permit, it's wise to check with your insurer, just in case, to be sure of your local laws.
"Teens are very likely to pick up the habits of their parents,” says J.C. Fawcett of the Defensive Driving School. “A parent should think about. Do I cuss at other drivers while driving? Do I speed? Do I tailgate? The training that comes from students observing their parents is very powerful. If a parent attempts to change their habits only when their teen is learning to drive, it's probably 10 years too late."
Being in the business for a very long time, I have found that most people are clueless about insurance, even most agents who sell them. I will agree that their rates are cheap. But I wouldn’t recommend them. Inexperienced adjusters. They do not fully investigate. The policy does not cover like, kind, and quality which is bad if you have a new vehicle.
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