Some insurance policies do not cover you for driving other vehicles at all, some allow this at an additional cost and some offer this benefit on an ‘emergency’ basis only. The answer to this question is that, unfortunately, there isn’t a clear answer. You will need to refer to your insurer’s terms and conditions for their specific stipulations on driving other cars.
After I switched to Progressive I got into a car accident. I did not know exactly what I needed to do, but the people at progressive helped me the entire way. All I had to do was choose where I wanted to have my car repaired and they did the rest. Since I used one if the shops they referred I had my car back in less than a week. Quick and painless, all I had to do was make a call.
I've had travelers for over thirty years. My insurance agent a few years ago left a message on my answering machine that I should give her a call and I might be able to save money on my insurance. And my insurance went down by over 1/3 of the cost. This year I had my all my policies starting the same date - my auto insurance is now for a year instead of two six month terms and I saved money on the year policy!
AARP (The Hartford group) save me over $600.00 a year on my home and Auto insurance. I was with Liberty Mutual for around 15 years and never had any claims. But they would not lower my premiums. The old proverbial straw was, this year they raised the rates on us again. So see ya later for sure. They do not appreciate their loyal good customers. Don't buy from them unless you like to give money away.
I shopped around for the best price for the coverage I wanted and Progressive undercut the others by around $1200. Every 6 months my monthly premium goes down. After the first six months we added another car, and the premium only went up by $6 because the policy dropped by such a significant amount. They've been good at getting my documents to me quickly, and having 24 hour customer service - which I'm coming to appreciate more and more with the odd hours I'm awake and work.
The day all parents dread is finally upon you; your teenage child is old enough to drive. But before they pop in a mix-tape (those are still a thing, right?) and step on the gas, they need to learn the rules of the road. ConsumerAffairs asked dozens of driving schools across the country for advice to make the process more enjoyable and educational for you and your student driver.
Build And Protect Your No Claims Bonus (NCB) – You build up your No Claims Bonus every year without making a claim. This of course has a dramatic effect in slashing your premiums. After 4 years you can “protect” your bonus. It’s well worth doing, because accidents do happen, and it’s reassuring to know your bonus won’t be affected and your premiums won’t soar up
"Teens are very likely to pick up the habits of their parents,” says J.C. Fawcett of the Defensive Driving School. “A parent should think about. Do I cuss at other drivers while driving? Do I speed? Do I tailgate? The training that comes from students observing their parents is very powerful. If a parent attempts to change their habits only when their teen is learning to drive, it's probably 10 years too late."

Best Health Insurance CompaniesBest Car Insurance CompaniesBest Life Insurance CompaniesTop 10 Best Insurance CompaniesBest Homeowners Insurance CompaniesTop Ten Funniest Things Drivers Have Written On Insurance FormsPositronWildhawkBest Renters Insurance ProvidersBest Pet Insurance ProvidersBest Motorcycle Insurance CompaniesBest Travel Medical Insurance ProvidersBest Insurance Agencies in BostonBarrowsInsTop Ten Big Data Analytics Companies In HealthcarejoewhiteBest Geico - Did You Know? Commercialswestofohio
Our wide range of insurance products will provide you the most comprehensive coverage at the most competitive rates in the market. You can count on us to tailor a plan that will cover all your insurance needs and personalize a package that works best for you. Allow our knowledgeable staff to provide you with the guidance necessary to meet any insurance needs you may have.
GoodFinancialCents.com has an advertising relationship with some of the offers included on this page. However, the rankings and listings of our reviews, tools and all other content are based on objective analysis. For more information, please check out our full disclaimer. GoodFinancialCents.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information in our reviews could be different from what you find when visiting a financial institution, service provider or a specific product's website. All products are presented without warranty.
I was in a car accident with a progressive client. I was the one filing the claim and had to be out of the country for a month. The progressive agent worked her ass off in order for me to have my car evaluated for damages. By the time I got back from my trip a check was sent for me with all the instructions. After this I just switched to progressive. Their service is amazing.
I've dealt with them on two homeowner claims (for my grandmother) and three auto claims (a $68k uninsured motorist claim and a broken windshield claim on my cars and my mom's car after she hit a deer). These claims have spanned the last nine years and each one was handled with a high level of professionalism, but also with decency, kindness and compassion. They are truly an honest company that pays the claims they owe quickly and fairly. When I was injured by the uninsured motorist in 2010, the first thing my attorney said when he saw that I had A-O was "you have nothing to worry about, they will take care of you."
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, more commonly known as Obamacare, impacted healthcare in the United States in numerous ways. The act's effects vary by person, but you'll need to have health insurance for at least nine months out of every 12 or be subject to a tax. There are exceptions to this rule based on financial hardship, your income and living situation. But in general, whether it's through Obamacare or not, you should have health insurance.
I was with Liberty Mutual for about 15 years and was very satisfied with their prices and service, although I never filed a claim. When I retired and moved from California to Florida, my auto rate went up a ridiculous amount, to almost $10,000 a year even though I had no accidents and one minor moving violation in the last ten years. On top of that, Liberty Mutual screwed up my umbrella policy and told me it was “unenforceable,” whatever that means, but I had to pay for the policy anyway up to the time I canceled and switched to Progressive, which cost about one third the cost of Liberty Mutual for an identical policy. Even good companies change over time.
×