Geico is the insurance company with the gecko mascot and the funny name. Geico stands for Government Employees Insurance Company, a name that dates to when Geico only served employees of the federal government and people in the military. Now, however, anyone can get an insurance policy with them. Geico insures 27 million vehicles each year with 16 million policies, giving it a 13 percent market share. Geico is a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway, making it a stock insurance company.
InsuranceQuotes is a free, online comparison tool that offers quoting processes for auto, life, health, homeowners, and other types of insurance. The site also has articles on insurance-related subjects and provides information on auto insurance by state, including average rates. It is is rated 1 out of 10, and has 9 user reviews on Resellerratings.
New auto, used auto, an individual or family — it takes just a few minutes to learn what you need and get moving. Take advantage of our cpmpetitive research and articles to better understand auto insurance with car insurance comparisons. If you already have a good grasp on things, then netQuote can also provide more information on how you can save on auto insurance and ways to shop for it as well. Our “auto insurance comparison made easy” section can guide you through the most common questions asked in regards to auto insurance.
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Unless you’re a teen driver, your gender isn’t a significant auto insurance rating factor. In fact, the national difference between car insurance premiums paid by women and men is less than 1%. For teenagers, this premium difference is much more dramatic: male teen drivers pay nearly $600 more per year than do female teens. Again, this comes back to the main goal of an insurance company – anticipating and limiting exposure to risk. Car insurance companies' historical data says young male drivers are more likely to take risks while driving than are female drivers in the same age group.
Insurance comparison websites can be further broken down into sites that provide real-time insurance quotes versus those that provide estimated ones. Estimated quotes are derived from historic data and are often out of date; to get the most accurate information you should use a site that provides real-time quotes generated by the insurance companies.

"Teens are very likely to pick up the habits of their parents,” says J.C. Fawcett of the Defensive Driving School. “A parent should think about. Do I cuss at other drivers while driving? Do I speed? Do I tailgate? The training that comes from students observing their parents is very powerful. If a parent attempts to change their habits only when their teen is learning to drive, it's probably 10 years too late."
Drivers with good driving records typically enjoy lower car insurance costs than drivers with histories of speeding tickets, at-fault accidents, or DUI citations. Virginia drivers without a recent at-fault accident can save 33% on their car insurance premiums, on average — nearly matching the 32% US average. In addition to earning a cheaper premium for driving incident-free, you may qualify for a safe-driving bonus through your car insurance company. The amount of these discounts may vary, but they typically run between 5 and 10%.
Auto insurance companies follow a variation on that model, but one that that allows them to make a profit. With modern insurance, policyholders purchase coverage from an insurance company. Like in a mutual aid society, everyone pays a little bit, so the insurance company has money on hand to pay for damages. However, because it’s unlikely that everyone who has a policy with an insurance company will make a claim for damages, the insurance company gets to keep the extra money as profit. In publicly traded, or stock, companies, the owners are the company’s stockholders. In other insurance companies, known as mutual companies, the owners are the policyholders, who get their share of the profits as dividends and potentially lower rates.
No, you just have to get proactive. You can call your agent to see if you qualify for a lower rate or you can shop around for a new policy. In fact, car insurance rates fluctuate so often and so widely that, no matter how you feel about your policy, it's a good idea to at least window-shop every one to three years. You can also ask your insurer if you qualify for any discounts.
Some insurance companies will provide their customers with a hire car for a limited period of time if their vehicle has been stolen. There is also the possibility of pre-purchasing a ‘discount hire car benefit’ or ‘comprehensive hire car benefit’, which will ensure you have access to a hire car while your vehicle is being repaired from damage caused in an accident.
Once you've decided on the amount of coverage you want, you’ll need to look at the insurance companies that offer it in your area, and see what they charge for it. You can get car insurance quotes by checking online or calling insurance agents or brokers in your area. Usually, an insurance agent works for one insurance company and only sells their policies, while an insurance broker sells insurance policies from many different companies. Insurance brokers are also sometimes called independent insurance agents. While a broker can help you compare prices and coverage options across many companies, they also receive commissions from those companies, so be careful you’re not talked into working with a company that’s not the best fit for you. By the same token, insurance agents are measured on the number and size of policies they sell, so make sure they aren’t trying to get you to buy more insurance than you need.
Insurance companies protect their profits by charging different people different rates for their premiums, based on the risk they represent – that is, how likely they are to get in an accident. Drivers in high-risk groups, which include inexperienced drivers and drivers with lots of tickets or previous crashes, will pay more for car insurance because they’re more likely to make a claim. The same is true for people who live in areas where their cars are more at risk to things like theft or natural disasters. People with expensive or hard-to-fix cars will also pay more because they’re likely to make more-expensive claims.
American Family Insurance (sometimes shortened to AmFam) only has a 2 percent market share for car insurance, but that small slice still translates to the company underwriting $4.4 billion in policies. American Family originally offered insurance to farmers, but now its policies are available to anyone. American Family is the parent company of The General car insurance. While The General car insurance is sold primarily online, American Family insurance is sold mainly through local insurance agents, with support from American Family’s online resources and call center.

No, you just have to get proactive. You can call your agent to see if you qualify for a lower rate or you can shop around for a new policy. In fact, car insurance rates fluctuate so often and so widely that, no matter how you feel about your policy, it's a good idea to at least window-shop every one to three years. You can also ask your insurer if you qualify for any discounts.

Car insurance is required in every state (and Washington DC) with three exceptions: New Hampshire, Missouri (uninsured drivers must submit “proof of financial responsibility” to the Department of Revenue), and Virginia (where drivers must pay a $500 fee to drive uninsured). These states still require at-fault drivers to pay for any bodily injury and property damage.
If you’ve ever compared car insurance rates, you know how many options are available. Depending on a variety of individual rating factors, certain companies will price your insurance differently. You could end up paying more by choosing the wrong company or failing to compare enough companies. We've outlined the factors that go into your car insurance premiums, as well as some tips for how to find the best possible rates. Let’s get started.
Insurance companies in the U.S. are an outgrowth of mutual aid societies. Prior to insurance companies (and cars, for that matter) community members would band together, often based on religious or ethnic affiliation, to provide funds in case of an emergency. Each member of a mutual aid society would pay a small amount into a fund that members could draw on in case of certain events, like a death in the family. The money the members pulled out of the fund could be used for things like burial expenses – and because everyone paid a little bit, no one person or family had to bear the full cost of an emergency when one struck.

Step 4: Narrow the field. As you examine each quote, go back online and read customer reviews of the company. If ratings matter to you, check rating companies like J.D. Power and A.M. Best. They can give you a good idea of what other customers have gone through when dealing with filing claims and customer service. Once you have looked over everything, narrow down your decisions. Eliminate one or more of your quotes.
The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
Liability insurance covers you if you’re in an accident deemed to be your fault. It will cover repairs to damaged property, as well as medical bills resulting from injury to the other driver and his or her passengers. Most states require at least a minimum amount of liability insurance, but it’s a good idea to purchase extra protection if you can afford it.
NerdWallet averaged rates for 30-year-old men and women for 10 ZIP codes in each state and Washington, D.C., from the largest insurers in each state. “Good drivers” had no moving violations on record and credit in the “good” tier as reported to each insurer. For the other two driver profiles, we changed the credit tier to “poor” or added one at-fault accident, keeping everything else the same. Sample drivers had the following coverage limits:
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