Classic Car Insurance: defined by many companies as being 19 to 24 years old, restored, in good working condition, and greater than the average value of other autos of the same make and model year; some insurers consider a car of this description that is only greater than 10 years old to be “classic.” The Classic Car Club of America regards classic vehicles to be those manufactured between 1925 and 1948.
Auto insurance companies follow a variation on that model, but one that that allows them to make a profit. With modern insurance, policyholders purchase coverage from an insurance company. Like in a mutual aid society, everyone pays a little bit, so the insurance company has money on hand to pay for damages. However, because it’s unlikely that everyone who has a policy with an insurance company will make a claim for damages, the insurance company gets to keep the extra money as profit. In publicly traded, or stock, companies, the owners are the company’s stockholders. In other insurance companies, known as mutual companies, the owners are the policyholders, who get their share of the profits as dividends and potentially lower rates.

But according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, newly licensed drivers are about eight times more likely to be involved in fatal crashes in their first six months than more experienced drivers. The takeaway? Experience counts. The Center for Disease Control suggests that increased education programs and parental involvement in instruction are associated with reductions of as many as 40% of fatal and injury crashes among 16-year-olds.
GEICO, well known for its animated gecko, has served as an underwriter to more than 16 million auto policies, which insure more than 24 million vehicles. The company’s size allows it to employ more than 36,000 people across nine regional offices, three service centers and three claims centers. GEICO’s original customer base consisted of U.S. government employees and military personnel. Today, the insurance company’s customer base has expanded to include people in the private sector.
Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide Investment Services Corporation, member FINRA. Home Office: One Nationwide Plaza, Columbus, OH. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle, and other marks displayed on this page are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, unless otherwise disclosed. © 2018 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.
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