What a rod to solder pot metal

which material to build the roll bar? (Question clarified, pictures of result attached)

  • Hello,
    I've screwed up 2m 8mm aluminum pipe and half a meter 8mm brass pipe while trying to build a roll bar for my Mojave / Hilux.
    With the aluminum tube, bending under heating was less of a problem than soldering. My tin solder should melt at 480 degrees, but the aluminum likes to melt earlier.
    Bending was the problem with brass tubing. Despite the sand in the pipe, it buckled badly. But soldering works better.

    Now my question. Should I try it with a rod instead of an aluminum tube? Is the diameter too big to bend? From a 1/10 perspective, I think that 8mm is actually still too little. Are really only 8cm.

    MfgALi23

    MfG Aljoscha

    Hilux on SCX 10
    Blazer on Trail Finder II

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    Brake lines. That's fine with that.
    Or welding wire.
    Soldering aluminum is not as easy as hatrt soldering.

  • Are there kinks with sand in the pipe? Then you haven't completely filled the pipe. There must be no air in there.

    ..... greetings from North Hesse from Klaus, the Axiallos happy model construction team

    My construction reports: Please press here very gently

    Oh, I can drive the few meters too

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    8mm are way too thick! In the original, cages are built with steel tubing between 45 and 60mm, 2.5-4mm wall thickness.

    In my experience, steel tubing is easier to bend with a thicker outer wall. So it is better to take 5x1 or 6x1 than the equivalent with only 0.5 wall.
    If the bending doesn't work for me, I often try to squeeze the kink with the help of the pliers. Of course, it takes the bend out a bit, but mostly also the kink and you can try again.

    You can braze steel wonderfully. For around 25 euros you can get a starter set with a blowtorch for gas cooker cartridges in the hardware store. Then add some flux and silver solder. The best way to get the last two is on ebay, because it's cheaper. And then do 3-10 test soldering and you can build the bracket.

    The brake line can also be bent fine, but it also bent it when I rolled over.

  • You have to fill the pipe with fine quartz sand and compress it a little. Close one end with a stopper and fill in the sand on the other side and tap the closed end more often on the floor or table, so that the sand compacts properly. Then also close the other end, which is hardly any air in the pipe. This is how it should go. The finer the sand, the better.

    Steel pipe or brass can actually be soldered well. Personally, I think the steel pipe is more suitable because it is more stable. And then soldering with silver solder. Is quite universally applicable.

  • Good Morning,

    I can only agree with the previous speakers in terms of tubular steel and brass, which can be soldered very well!
    It is always important to sand the soldering points with fleece or fine sandpaper before soldering ...

    Since the problem occurs with most of them with the kinking of the pipes, it is because the "minimum bending radius" should be adhered to!
    If the bending radius is too small, the pipes kink and with solid material it can tear ...
    So look in the well-known search engines for "minimum bending radius" because it changes due to the different pipe diameters!
    (So ​​smart ass mode-off.)

    Greetings from Duisburg
    Christian

    "A clever man does not make all mistakes himself. He also gives others a chance." (Winston Churchill)

  • I can sign everything that has been said.
    In addition, the information that you can also braze aluminum for weight reasons.
    You need special solder and, above all, non-anodized material. The Alfer stuff from the hardware store is not good for it. The aluminum melts away from under the anodized layer.
    I did it this way with my current car and it has already held up a couple of hearty rollovers.

    greeting
    Sven

    FSK 12 = The good gets the wife
    FSK 16 = The bad guy gets the bad guy
    FSK 18 = everyone gets the wife

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    Hello,

    The subject is not entirely new.

    Tips for overflowing cages

    I have another cage in the works right now, and it works with the stainless steel and the pouring.

    MfG gentlemen

  • Man that was quick!
    Thank you for all the tips!

    What about the aluminum solder? I would have liked to have taken sipber solder in the shop, but that was quite expensive and since I originally wanted to solder aluminum I used aluminum solder. That was also much cheaper.
    Can I also use this to solder steel?

    And if you want to solder two struts T-like, Kerstin, do you fit the vertical strut (in the case of a T) so that the horizontal one is pure, or do you drill a hole in the horizontal one to insert the vertical one?

    And by steel you don't mean stainless steel, do you?
    MfgAli23

    MfG Aljoscha

    Hilux on SCX 10
    Blazer on Trail Finder II

  • Since the name suggests that Alulot is a solder for aluminum, I very much doubt that you can solder steel with it.
    You will get the parts together, but that only lasts until the first exit.

    Sven

    FSK 12 = The good gets the wife
    FSK 16 = The bad guy gets the bad guy
    FSK 18 = everyone gets the wife

  • I consider it impossible to connect aluminum (solder) with steel (pipe) in this way.

    With the T-connection, I would mill or file a "fish mouth" at one end. then, through the larger area, you have a great connection to the next pipe.

    Whoever thinks will not flee !!! (Isaiah 28:16)

    greeting
    Bernd

  • Alright thanks!

    I've already tried it the fish-mouth way. Once I managed to connect two aluminum struts like this. But I messed up the thing on the other side and to see how stable the connection is, I hit it with a hammer. It was really bombproof.

    Then I'll look for a pipe bending pliers, look for a pipe with a smaller diameter and use silver solder.

    The question about steel has not yet been clarified. Do you mean VA (stainless steel) or normal steel?

    MFG Ali23

    MfG Aljoscha

    Hilux on SCX 10
    Blazer on Trail Finder II

  • Whether VA or "normal" steel is up to you. I use both. Brake lines can be processed very well. It is available in 4.75mm and 6mm as unconfigured yard goods. You then have to remove the powder coating at the connection points. Or you can get a galvanized 6x1 hydraulic pipe as a rod.

    Whoever thinks will not flee !!! (Isaiah 28:16)

    greeting
    Bernd

  • Or simply 6x1 steel pipe from the hardware store. It worked fine for me too. Now you have to see that the places where you want to solder are clean. Reach it with emery once.
    And make sure that there is enough heat in both places to be connected.
    The rule here is that the solder joint must melt the solder, not the flame.

    Sven

    FSK 12 = The good gets the wife
    FSK 16 = The bad guy gets the bad guy
    FSK 18 = everyone gets the wife

  • Thank you again!

    The tips helped me a lot. So that you can see "your" success, I'll show you the result.

    For my first job dealing with pipes, brass and brazing, I find it very attractive.

    First I built a primitive bumper.

    I covered the bumper with Plasti Dip. Has the advantage that it doesn't scratch that quickly and I can simply pull it off again if something breaks off.

    And that is the roll-over bar.

    Tomorrow I'll buy a can of matt black and paint it.

    mfgAli23

    MfG Aljoscha

    Hilux on SCX 10
    Blazer on Trail Finder II