How to play Tetris on bass

How do you immediately play the major triad on bass?

In the article you will learn how to play all major triads on the bass right away and get an overview of which major triads are available.
 
A major triad always consists of three tones that are played simultaneously or one after the other. One speaks of a chord when the notes are played at the same time. On the bass, you usually play the notes one after the other. This is called as a chord breakdown, broken chord, or arpeggio.
 
As always, there is no fear! In addition to the notation, you can find all examples as bass TABS and as a graphic representation of the fingerboard. Reading notes is not necessary to understand music theory.
 
 
 
 

C major triad


 
The major triad is derived from the major scale. In the figure below you can see the 8 notes of the C major scale. The major triad is formed from the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale.
 

 
The C major triad thus consists of the notes C, E and G.
 
In the example below you can see the C major chord in the first bar on the far left. With him all notes are played in the same way. In the three bars to the right you can see the chord breakdown or the arpeggio, in which the notes are played one after the other.
 
 
In the illustration below you can see the notes of the C major triad on the bass.
 
 
You usually play the 3 notes one after the other on the bass. You can see the order in the following illustration:
 
 
Play the notes of the C major triad in ascending order of the numbers. I have retained the numbers of the notes from the C major scale. This way you can better memorize that the major triad always consists of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale. This understanding will help you in many other areas of music theory.
 
 
First start with the 1st note of the C major scale => a C
Then you play the 3rd note of the C major scale => an E.
Finally you play the 5th note of the C major scale => a G
 
Ideally you play the notes of the major triad with a certain fingering:
 
1st tone = C = middle finger
3rd tone = E = index finger
5th tone = G = little finger
 
If you play this fingering from another note, e.g. the G (3rd fret on your E string), you play the G major triad.
 
 
 

 
 
 

There is another fingering for the major triad. The following illustration shows the notes on the fretboard for the second fingering.
 

 
You can also see the sequence of the tones in the following illustration. Here, too, the numbers from the notes from the C major scale have been retained.
 
 
With this fingering, you play the triad as follows:
 
1st tone = C = little finger
3rd tone = E = ring finger
5th tone = G = index finger
(In this case the 5th note is the open G-string, you don't have to grab it)
 
With the fingering, the G is on a different string than the E. You can thus play all notes at the same time as a chord. Give it a try to see what a chord sounds like on the bass.
 
 
 
 

G major triad


 
In the illustration below you can see the G major scale. The major triad always consists of the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale.
 
 
 

1. Fingering of the G major triad

In the illustrations below you can see the notes of the G major triad and their order when you play them one after the other.
 

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the G major triad

In the illustrations below you can see another possible fingering for the G major triad.
 

 
 
In the following, chords are not shown, since in this pitch no chords are usually played on the bass.
 
 
 
 

D major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the D major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the D major triad

 
 
 
 
 

A major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the A major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the A major triad

 
 
 
 
 

E major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the E major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the E major triad

 
 
 
 
 

B major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the B major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the B major triad

 
 
 
 
 

F sharp major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the F sharp major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the F sharp major triad

 
You cannot use the 2nd fingering on this F sharp (2nd fret on your E string). Instead, you can play the fingering from a higher F sharp e.g. from the F sharp on the 8th fret on your A string.
 
 
 
 

C sharp major triad


 

 
 

1. Fingering of the C sharp major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the C sharp major triad

 
 
 
 
 

F major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the F major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the F major triad

 
 
 
 
 

B flat major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the B flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the B flat major triad

 
 
 
 
 

E-flat major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the E flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the E-flat major triad

 
 
 
 
 

A flat major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the A flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the A flat major triad

 
 
 
 
 

D flat major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the D flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the D flat major triad

 
 
 
 
 

G flat major triad


 
 
 

1. Fingering of the G flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the G flat major triad

You cannot use the 2nd fingering with this Ges. Instead, you can play the fingering from a higher gib, e.g. from the gib on the 9th fret on your A string.
 
 
 
 

C flat major triad


 

 
 

1. Fingering of the C flat major triad

 
 
 

2. Fingering of the C flat major triad

You cannot use the 2nd fingering on this Cb (2nd fret on your A string). You can play the fingering with the C on the 7th fret on your E string instead.
 
 
 
 

Author MichaelPosted on Categories Blog