What clothes did medieval knights wear?

Clothing in the Middle Ages

For the people of the Middle Ages, clothing meant protection from the effects of the weather on the one hand, and on the other it was a visible expression of the class and the rank within the class. The affiliation to a certain social class could thus be read from the clothing. Written and pictorial sources are primarily used to reconstruct the development of medieval clothing, as only a small number of original clothing has survived. Most of the figures, however, show people of high social status; members of the lower classes are rarely found among them.

Clothes according to gender

The peasant clothes had to be primarily functional and suitable for work. Most importantly, it was comfortable and wide, and this applies to both women and men. In court society giThere are fashionable developments over time that clearly distinguish the sexes from one another. From around the middle of the 14th century, a style of clothing developed that emphasized the gender characteristics of women. Dresses now had a cleavage, were tight-fitting and therefore body-hugging. More on this...

Clothing by epoch

The peasant clothing remained almost the same throughout the Middle Ages, but there were constant changes among the higher classes. From the 10th century onwards, the men's skirt lengthened, and a second was worn under the tunic as an underdress. The coat was adjusted to the new length, tight-fitting trousers were added. The women's clothing of this time consisted of two tunics worn one above the other, over which a coat was pulled. From the 12th century, courtly women's clothing consisted of an undergarment (shirt), an upper garment (skirt) and a coat. Shirt and skirt were now tied tightly to the body, which led to the emphasis on the feminine forms. The head was mostly covered with veils or hoods. The male members of the higher classes wore an undergarment made of fine materials under an upper garment. This was a skirt with a tight top, over which a coat was pulled. Headgear was a Schapel or a hat. More on this...

Clothes according to the state

The social differentiation through fashion was already recognizable in Franconian times. The Franconian costume showed a mixture of Germanic and ancient elements. Long linen trousers were worn under a tunic-like skirt, over which a coat was pulled. The peasant clothes essentially consisted of a smock, trousers, dress and waist shoes. The clothing of the higher classes was characterized above all by the fact that it was colorful and consisted of finer and sometimes very valuable materials. The shape of the clothing also indicated the level of its wearer. The respective narrowness and Length of clothing enabled people of the Middle Ages to draw conclusions about the social status of the wearer, because the common people wore loose and comfortable clothing in which they could work unhindered. More on this...

clothes

The clothes that were worn throughout the Middle Ages by the peasants included smocks, dresses, wide trousers and waist shoes, but also very simple variants of clothes that the higher classes also wore, such as the cotte. The clothing of the nobility included the tunic-like skirt, tight-fitting trousers, court dresses and the coat. Pointed toe shoes were only worn by the nobility as an outward sign of their status. The more pointed the shoes, the higher the status of the wearer. Headgear for noble men was a hat or hat, for women a veil or bonnet. More on this...

Materials and manufacturing processes

It applies to the peasant clothing that it consisted of simple materials that were produced and processed by the farmers themselves. These were usually linen, flax and wool. These materials were also used for the clothing of the nobility, but there were also valuable fabrics that were elaborately manufactured, such as silk and brocade. The farmers made their clothes themselves, the nobility usually had their own workshops. With the development of the urban centers, production facilities such as weaving mills were established, in which fabrics were manufactured commercially. More on this...